Here are some brief details about Three Ws’ of West Indies cricket as well as their complete Test career record. The Three Ws’ of West Indies cricket has been the greatest ever Test cricketer. Incidentally, they all belonged to Barbados – although they did appear for other Caribbean nations too in first-class cricket. And all made their Test debut in the same series.
CL Walcott and ED Weekes first appeared in a Test match – together, in fact – against England at Bridgetown in 1947-48, which was the first Test of the rubber. FMM Worrell joined them in the second Test played in Port-of-Spain. Of the three, Worrell had the longest Test career, but he died at a very young age of 42 back in 1967.
All three were bestowed upon the Knighthood – given the title of ‘Sir’, Worrell in 1964. Walcott in 1994 and Weekes in 1995 Sir Clyde Leopold Walcott was born on January 17, 1926, and died in 2006, on August 26, at the age of 80. He was a right-hand batsman, right-arm fast-medium bowler, and capable wicket-keeper.
His Test record, from 1948 to 1960, was: Tests 44, 3,798 runs (average 56.68), the highest score was 220, including 15 100s, 14 50s, and 53 catches, 11 stumping, 11 wickets (average 37.09), best 3-50.
Three Ws' of West Indies cricket has been greatest ever Test cricketer. Incidentally they all belonged to Barbados, all made their Test debut in same series
Three Ws’ of West Indies cricket has been the greatest ever Test cricketer.
Sir Everton de Courcy Weekes was born on February 26, 1925. He is very much alive and turned 95 this month. He was a right-hand batsman and occasional leg-break bowler.
His Test record, from 1948 to 1958, was: Tests matches 48, Runs 4,455 (average 58.61) with the highest score of 207, including 15 100s, 19 50s, 49 catches, one wicket for 77 runs, best 1-8. David Murray, who played 19 Tests for the West Indies as wicket-keeper/batsman from 1978 to 1982, is Weekes’s son.
Sir Frank Mortimer Maglinne Worrell was born on August 1, 1924, and died on March 13, 1967, at the age of 42. He had been suffering from leukemia (blood cancer) for some time. Worrell was a right-hand batsman and a left-arm bowler of fast-medium or slow spinners. His Test record, from 1948 to 1963, was: Tests 51, 3,860 runs (average 49.48), highest score 261, including 9 100s, 22 50s, 43 catches, 69 wickets (average 38.72), best 7-70, 5wl 2.
Moreover, Walcott and Weekes never captained the West Indies, but Worrell gained fame, recognition, and respect as one of the nation’s finest leaders in his 15-Test tenure from 1960-61 to 1963. He was captain (Richie Benaud was leading Australia) for the first time in December 1960 when the West Indies were involved in the first tied result in a Test match, at Brisbane. He led his team to nine wins overall against only three defeats, in addition to a tie and two draws.Three Ws' of West Indies cricket has been greatest ever Test cricketer. Incidentally they all belonged to Barbados, all made their Test debut in same series
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