Ian Chappell teaches the West Indies a lesson
This is the moment when the West Indies came face-to-face with the stark realities of Test cricket in the 1970s. It’s Sydney in 1976, and Clive Lloyd’s side are 2-1 down in the series and trying desperately for a breakthrough. Ian Chappell plays at his first ball from Michael Holding, and all the close fielders are convinced he has edged it to the wicketkeeper, Deryck Murray. Ian Chappell, as usual, stands his ground, and umpire Reg Ledwidge gives him ‘not out’.
That sparked off an amazing performance from Michael Holding: he cried, gesticulated, and sat down for five minutes, refusing to bowl. Lance Gibbs and Clive Lloyd had to plead with him to resume the over. Eventually Ian Chappell was out; he caught Murray and bowled Michael Holding, ironically enough.
He had only scored four, but the psychological damage to the West Indies was done. Greg Chappell came in, was dropped when he had scored only eleven, and went on to make 182 not out as the West Indies were distracted and moaned about the umpiring. They allowed their concentration to lapse completely; they lost the test and ended up 5-1.
Losers of the series
After that series, the West Indian became a meaner Test cricketer. They did no favor’s to the umpires or the opposition. Ian Chappell had gained some illustrious converts to his philosophy of how Test cricket should be played.
Ian Chappell teaches the West Indies a lesson
Ian Chappell teaches the West Indies a lesson. This is the moment when the West Indies came face-to-face with the stark realities of Test cricket in the 1970s.