Godfrey Evans, who could ever forget the Oval Test and the scenes from the balcony at the end of the match? Australia, true to form, had won the toss—for the fifth time. I remember Len coming back into the dressing room and saying, “Out on the field, lads, out on the field… I’ve done it again.”. The Australians batted first, and I remember very clearly how Lindsay Hassett walked out to the wicket with Arthur Morris and took guard, facing Alec Bedser. Therefore, Alec Bedser sent down the first ball, and where it pitched, it left a mark as if the ball had crushed the soil.
Lindsay Hassett looked around at me and said out of the corner of his mouth, “I can see who this wicket’s been made for.” Later, the story was told that Bert Lock, the Surrey groundsman, had said to an Australian that the wicket would last for days, and the Australian was supposed to have replied, “What, two days!” It may not have been a good wicket, but it was a fast-bowler, Fred Trueman, and the medium-paced Alec Bedser who were successful in Australia’s first innings, and they did make 275. One other lasting memory. Lord’s, and Trevor and Willie.
I remember how weary they looked at tea time, but they were very confident. They both slumped down in chairs in the dressing room, leaned back, relaxed their tensed muscles, closed their eyes, and sat quite still. We didn’t say much to them, left them there, and went to tea. After the interval, they were as good as ever. When they were both out at 246 for 6, I went to the wicket to join Freddie Brown. It was a long walk after that magnificent performance. There was no way I was going to get out. Unforgettable.
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Godfrey Evans, who could ever forget The Oval Test  - Godfrey Evans the 'keeper who seems to be taking this catch at silly point - it's Trent Bridge in 1954 and Hanif Mohammad was on 51, scored in, for him, a distinctly skittish 75 minutes
Godfrey Evans, who could ever forget The Oval Test