Frank Hayes – The Future Batsman of England

Frank Hayes anticipated a big surprise to world cricket in the early 1970s. But unfortunately, he didn’t justice with his talent. Here is an article predicting about Frank Hayes a big hope for England cricket. Lancashire occupied an unaccustomed lowly position in the Championship table in the first two months of the season. New captain David Lloyd found his bowlers were struggling — particularly Ken Shuttleworth, who managed only eight wickets in six innings, and Peter Lever who fell away after a 10-wicket start against Northamptonshire.
Frank Hayes anticipated a big surprise to world cricket in the early 1970s. But unfortunately, he didn't justice with his talent.
Frank Hayes anticipated a big surprise to world cricket in the early 1970s. But unfortunately, he didn’t justice with his talent.
Peter Lee, originally recruited from Northamptonshire as a replacement when either of these two was on Test duty, found himself the main strike force. Lloyd was struck on the nose while fielding at short leg in the match against Oxford University — and not long afterward was knocked unconscious by a shot from Majid Khan in the Benson and Hedges quarter-final at Old Trafford. Lloyd was taken to hospital and has since vowed never to field at short leg again.
Incidentally, Majid Khan was out of the shot for the ball rebounded to Harry Pilling at mid-on. Now Lancashire has no “suicide” fielder on the leg side. No one wants to go there. Except for Lloyd and Pilling, who both made centuries, Lancashire’s main batsmen failed to make big scores. A particular disappointment was West Indian Test star Clive Lloyd who left Lancashire to join the touring side without having made a century.
Frank Hayes, whose 88 in the Test trial was highly commended by the selectors, was another disappointment.
Frank Hayes, whose 88 in the Test trial was highly commended by the selectors, was another disappointment.
Frank Hayes, whose 88 in the Test trial was highly commended by the selectors, was another disappointment. So was wicketkeeper Farokh Engineer. Despite their failings in the three-day games, Lancashire maintained their reputation in one-day cricket. They swamped Glamorgan to reach the last four of the Benson and Hedges Cup, and just before the halfway stage in the John Player League, they held the sixth position, eight points behind the leaders.
In the 1970s Lancashire star Frank Hayes, made a stunning Test debut (106 Not out vs West Indies in 1973) was a false dawn. Unfortunately in his next 8 Tests, Frank Hayes averaged just 8.13. Perhaps he should have done better,” he said. “But I’m not at all bitter. If you didn’t do yourself justice, it was down to me.”
Ray Illingworth shakes hands with Frank Hayes at Leeds in July 1973. Hayes had been called into the squad for the 3rd Test v NZ at Headingley but did not play.
Ray Illingworth shakes hands with Frank Hayes at Leeds in July 1973. Hayes had been called into the squad for the 3rd Test v NZ at Headingley but did not play.
Frank Hayes is congratulated by spectators on reaching his hundred in the second innings of his Test debut, England v West Indies, 1st Test, The Oval, July 31st 1973.
Frank Hayes is congratulated by spectators on reaching his hundred in the second innings of his Test debut, England v West Indies, 1st Test, The Oval, July 31st, 1973.